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ATSNJ Regional Meetings

Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization for the Athletic Trainer

Hosted By Ivy Rehab Physical Therapy in Partnership with the Athletic Trainers’ Society of NJ

Locations: Hackensack and Freehold, NJ May 9, 2015 9AM-12PM

Medford, NJ May 7, 2015 9AM-12PM

Approved course for 3 category A CEUs

Cost: Free for ATSNJ Members/$25.00 for non-members    

Register online based on the location you will be attending.

ATSNJ Northern Meeting, Hackensack office, May 9, 9am-12pm

ATSNJ Central Meeting, Freehold office, May 9, 9am-12pm

ATSNJ Southern Meeting, Medford office, May 7, 9am-12pm

ATSNJ Southern Region Meeting 4/23/2015

The ATSNJ Southern Region is hosting a CEU event on Thursday, April 23rd at 9am.  The topic is Concussion Rehab: A Team Approach,  This event will be held at the Ivy Rehab facility in Mt Laurel, NJ.

This event is free for ATSNJ Members and $25 for non-members.  Please visit the registration website for more information.

Online Registration

Click for more information.

 

March 31- Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Today brings a close to athletic training month and the athletic training month tips of the day.  At the ATSNJ, we are committed to sports safety so be sure to continue to visit our website as your main resource for sport safety tips and athletic training news.

If you read a tip that you found useful you can always come back to read it.  All tips for March 2015 athletic training month at http://atsnj.org/tags/tip-day

Remember to continue to promote sports safety everyday and that

"We Prepare - You Perform"

 

March 30 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Sports, Exercise, and the Benefits of Physical Activity for Individuals with Autism

With the disgnosis of autism on the rise at an alarming rate, more and more students diagnosed with this affliction are beginning to particpate in organized sports.  Its interesting to note that according to Autism Speaks, "research and anecdotal evidence suggest that some alternative therapeutic choices that include sports, exercise, and other physical activities can be a useful adjunct to traditional behavioral interventions, leading to improvement in symptoms, behaviors, and quality of life for individuals with autism."

The Autism Speaks website provides a plethora of excellent information for helping these brave children.

March 29 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

With the Lacrosse regular season fast approaching, its always a good idea to review a few tips regarding helmets in lacrosse.

US Lacrosse has an article on the proper ways to remove a lacrosse helmet facemask, since they can differ from the typical football helmet that many emergency personnel are more familiar with.

Lacrosse Helmet Facemask/Chinguard Removal Hints

US LAcrosse also provides these recommendations for helmet fitting.

March 28 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

 

Ice or Heat for Sports Injury

Do you know when to use ice and when to use heat on a sports injury?

Acute and Chronic Injuries

Acute injuries are sudden, sharp, traumatic injuries that occur immediately (or within hours) and cause pain (possibly severe pain). Most often acute injuries result from some sort of impact or trauma such as a fall, sprain, or collision and it's pretty obvious what caused the injury.

Acute injuries also cause common signs and symptoms of injury such as pain, tenderness, redness, skin that is warm to the touch, swelling and inflammation. If you have swelling, you have an acute injury.

Chronic Injuries, on the other hand, can be subtle and slow to develop. They sometimes come and go, and may cause dull pain or soreness. They are often the result of overuse, but sometimes develop when an acute injury is not properly treated and doesn't heal.

Ice

Icing an injured body part is an important part of treatment. Icing injuries can be effective for sprains, strains, overuse injuries and bruises.

DOE releases Student Cardiac Assessment Module

The New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE) is pleased to announce the availability of the Student Cardiac Assessment professional development module (PD module) required by the Scholastic Student-Athlete Safety Act (P.L.2013, c.71). Physicians, advanced practice nurses and physicians assistants are required to complete the PD module before performing any student-athlete pre-participation physical examination prior to the first official practice of the athletic season starting with 2015-2016 school year. The legislation required the development of the PD module to increase the assessment skills of the health care providers who perform student-athlete physical examinations and screening. The PD module can be found at 

http://www.state.nj.us/education/students/safety/health/services/athlete/PDModule.shtml

Additionally, the Sudden Cardiac Death in Young Athletes pamphlet is available at

http://www.state.nj.us/education/students/safety/health/services/cardiac.pdf

March 26 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Youth Sports Injury Prevention Suggestion

Here good document on sports safety recommendations.  While  mainly focused on Japan, there are some good pieces of information that are pertinent to sports safety in the United States. Particularly suggestions for reducing injuries and head injuries. There are also some good statistics as well.

Topics covered include:

  • Youth Sports Injury Prevention
  • The scope of the youth sports injury problem in the United States
  • Recommendation to prevent youth sports injuries

To read the entire https://coa.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/AaronLMillerUSAReportforMRIForCOA.pdf

March 25 - ATSNJ Tip of the Day

It's already the end of March, but Mother Nature simply refuses to allow the springtime weather to take hold in NJ.

With that in mind, people who exercise often forget that exercising in the cold can also present potential health hazards.  Cold weather directly affects the cardiovascular and respitory systems as well as leads to a 5x quicker depletion of glycogen stores, something very important to note when working with the diabetic population.

With this in mind, here are a series of articles on exercising in the cold weather.

Cold Weather Exercise

Cold-related Illnesses and Emergencies

Exposure Injuries

 

March 24 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

As a follow up to yesterday tip of the day.  Here are some tips that may work for you as you try to avoid shin pain.

  • Increase stride rate to around 180 steps per minute. You can measure your stride rate by counting the number of times a single foot hits the ground in a minute, then multiplying by two.  180 is the rate that most top endurance runners have.  
  • Minimize the number of hard workouts. Running hard puts more strain on your shins.  Build up a slow mileage base until you beat shin pain.  At the very least, don’t run hard two days in a row.  Mix in very slow runs and off days to let your shins recover.
  • Run almost exclusively on soft trails, tracks, or treadmills. 
  • Wear the proper shoe for your feet.
  • Stretch before and after every run.

If shin pains does occur seek the appropriate medical attention fro evaluation and the proper treatment strategies.

 

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