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Illinois Athletic Trainer Saves High School Baseball Catcher's Life

A Manual High School baseball player is thankful to be alive after a baseball game last Tuesday took a turn for the worst.  Austin Noel was the catcher in a game against Tremont.  During the fourth inning, a foul ball caught Noel under his face mask, hit him in the throat and knocked him unconscious. That blocked his airway.

Luckily, an athletic trainer was in the dugout and helped save Noel's life.

The details of what happened April 1 may be fuzzy for Noel, but what he does know is that Greg Eberle took the lead in saving his life.

"Never in my career have I had to deal with a situation like that," said Eberle, Assistant Director of Sports Medicine at Hopedale Medical Complex.

Last Tuesday, a foul ball turned your typical high school game into a race to save one player's life.

"Greg opened my airway and gave me the breath, basically the life I needed to live," said Noel.  Noel's airway was blocked after a foul ball hit him in the throat.

"When we got him down he was gurgling which is not really breathing," Eberle said. "He did go unconscious and he was non-responsive at the time."  Eberle tried to clear the airway and started mouth-to-mouth while the school nurse monitored his heart until emergency crews arrived.

Montclair State University Athletic Training Student Saves a Life

March was Athletic Training Month. The theme of the year is "We’ve Got Your Back." On Thursday, March 20, 2014, senior Athletic Training Education Program student Valentina Glavan took the National Athletic Trainers’ Association slogan literally.
 
While eating lunch, Montclair State University Assistant Athletic Trainer Joe Savoia started to choke on his sandwich. At first everyone thought he was joking around or trying to create an emergency situation for the students to respond to. Unfortunately, the episode was all too real.
 
Glavan was nearby and immediately stepped in. She gave Savoia five back blows with no results. He was still choking and getting very anxious. With no hesitation she then applied abdominal thrusts. On the fourth attempt a clump of food shot out of his mouth.
 
According to Glavan, “the main thing this experience has taught me is that you really never know what's going to happen at any time. Sometimes the things we learn in class, the things we really need to know can get a little tedious and repetitious. We spent a whole semester on Emergency Care and sometimes you think to yourself that ‘it can't happen to me’ but it can – it did."

Athletic Trainers In Demand

Early in his high school career, Ryan Arnold, a lacrosse player, wound up with chronic exertional compartment syndrome, a painful muscle and nerve condition caused in athletes by repetitive exercise.

It wasn't properly diagnosed until his senior year, when a new athletic trainer at his school committed himself to figuring out why Arnold's legs hurt so much. Arnold had surgery and was able to play the sport in college.

"I saw the effect that a good athletic trainer can have on somebody's future," said the 26-year-old athletic trainer with the University of Rochester Medical Center's Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

According to the New York Department of Labor,employment opportunities for athletic trainers are expected to grow by 28.6 percent between 2010 and 2020 in the Finger Lakes region. Demand should increase as awareness grows about sports-related injuries at young ages.

Arnold, who has a bachelor's degree in sports medicine from Pennsylvania's Mercyhurst University and is licensed as a certified athletic trainer through New York state, splits his time between URMC's sports medicine clinic in Brighton and the Aquinas Institute on Dewey Avenue.

He focuses on preventing injuries, as well as providing emergency and rehabilitation care for injuries. Weekend games at Aquinas, where he works with more than 20 sports teams in grades 7 to 12, are responsible for his typical six-day workweek.

March 31- Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Today brings a close to athletic training month and the athletic training month tips of the day.  At the ATSNJ, we are committed to sports safety so be sure to continue to visit our website as your main resource for sport safety tips and athletic training news.

If you read a tip that you found useful you can always come back to read it.  All tips for March 2013 athletic training month at http://atsnj.org/tags/tip-day

Remember to continue to promote sports safety everyday and that

"We've Got Your Back"

 

March 30 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Sports, Exercise, and the Benefits of Physical Activity for Individuals with Autism

With the disgnosis of autism on the rise at an alarming rate, more and more students diagnosed with this affliction are beginning to particpate in organized sports.  Its interesting to note that according to Autism Speaks, "research and anecdotal evidence suggest that some alternative therapeutic choices that include sports, exercise, and other physical activities can be a useful adjunct to traditional behavioral interventions, leading to improvement in symptoms, behaviors, and quality of life for individuals with autism."

The Autism Speaks website provides a plethora of excellent information for helping these brave children.

March 29 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

With the Lacrosse regular season fast approaching, its always a good idea to review a few tips regarding helmets in lacrosse.

US Lacrosse has an article on the proper ways to remove a lacrosse helmet facemask, since they can differ from the typical football helmet that many emergency personnel are more familiar with.

Lacrosse Helmet Facemask/Chinguard Removal Hints

US LAcrosse also provides these recommendations for helmet fitting.

LifeVest Wearable Defibrillator Saves Arizona Man From Sudden Cardiac Arrest

A Valley man who was one of the first responders to the World Trade Center on 9/11 says he nearly died in front of his son recently, but a wearable defibrillator saved his life.
 
Luis Alicea, 50, had his first heart attack about 10 years ago. He's had some ongoing heart issues ever since. Several weeks ago, Dr. Fredrick Klopf of Cardiac Solutions, Alicea's cardiologist urged for retired NYPD officer to wear a LifeVest.
 
"It came down to the point where Dr. Klopf, my cardiologist, was in fear for my life," Alicea said. "When he issued me this LifeVest, it turned out to be just that."
 
Alicea was at the movies with his son, Anthony, when he suddenly collapsed in the lobby. He suffered a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and might have died then and there had it not been for his LifeVest.
 
Klopf said the LifeVest is a great device for people who have heart damage, be it from a heart attack or an infection, but aren't quite ready for an implanted device.
 
"This LifeVest can serve as a bridge and be life-saving for those individuals who are at risk," Klopf said.
 
Alicea is living proof of that.
 
"I think it's just priceless for him," Klopf said.
 
Without immediate treatment with a defibrillator, SCA can turn fatal within minutes. Automatic external defibrillators like those found in many public places require a bystander to step in and take action. The LifeVest removes the third party from the life-and-death equation.
 

March 28 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

 

Ice or Heat for Sports Injury

Do you know when to use ice and when to use heat on a sports injury?

Acute and Chronic Injuries

Acute injuries are sudden, sharp, traumatic injuries that occur immediately (or within hours) and cause pain (possibly severe pain). Most often acute injuries result from some sort of impact or trauma such as a fall, sprain, or collision and it's pretty obvious what caused the injury.

Acute injuries also cause common signs and symptoms of injury such as pain, tenderness, redness, skin that is warm to the touch, swelling and inflammation. If you have swelling, you have an acute injury.

Chronic Injuries, on the other hand, can be subtle and slow to develop. They sometimes come and go, and may cause dull pain or soreness. They are often the result of overuse, but sometimes develop when an acute injury is not properly treated and doesn't heal.

Ice

Icing an injured body part is an important part of treatment. Icing injuries can be effective for sprains, strains, overuse injuries and bruises.

March 27 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Preventing Little League Elbow

"Little League Elbow" -- is an inflammation of the inner elbow that affects an alarming number of youth baseball players across America. Pitchers are most affected by this injury, which is the result of the excessive stress on the growth plate in a child’s forearm caused by excessive throwing. Children who experience little league elbow often complain of pain on the inside of their elbows and an inability to fully extend their arms.

Here are a few steps you can take to prevent little league elbow before it starts. 

1. Monitor pitch counts. 

  •  9-10  year olds should throw no more than 50 pitches per game, or 75 in a week.
  • 11-12 year olds should be kept to 75 pitches per game and 100 per week.
  • 13-15 year olds should keep their counts under 75 per game and 125 per week.​

2. Monitor the frequency of  pitching.

The number of times you pitch during the week is also important. Even in the major leagues, starting pitchers throw only once every four days. Rest time should depend on the number of pitches thrown in the last game. For pitchers ages 7-16, pitch counts can be easily broken up into units of 20. For example, 20 pitches or fewer require one day of rest; 20-40 require two days off; 40-60 require three days of rest; and anything above 60 pitches requires a break of at least four days.​

Study: Concussion recovery time doubles when injury is sustained during school year

Concussions and the treatment after one is sustained have been at the forefront of media coverage in recent years. What once was viewed by some as brag-worthy or a badge of honor now is being taken seriously for its potential immediate and long-term effects.
 
While progress has been made in how the seriousness of a concussion is perceived, it’s still relatively unknown when it’s acceptable for individuals, including children, to return to normal cognitive and physical activity after suffering one.
 
According to a study by the Concussion Clinic at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, a child who sustains a concussion during the school year takes significantly more time to recover than one who suffers a similar injury during the summer.
 
“We were surprised at the magnitude of the differences,” Robert Doss, PsyD, co-director of the Pediatric Concussion Program and one of the study’s researchers, said. “We weren’t surprised that it was in that direction; just simply that the magnitude was what it was.”
 
Researchers took patients seen in the Concussion Clinic at Children’s from 2011-12 — 43 children who suffered concussions during the school year and 44 injured in the summer — and monitored their progress. For the children who sustained a concussion in the summer, the average number of days to recover was 35. Recovery time more than doubled (72 days) when the injury was sustained during the school year.
 

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