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Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School (NJ) Athletic Trainer Saves the Life of a Spectator

                On April 28, 2015, Laura Friedman was preparing for a lacrosse game at Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School like she would any other game. Laura, the school’s Athletic Trainer, was conferring with her coaches at mid field while the team warmed up for their game when she saw a group of people moving quickly in the stands. Upon scanning the area, Laura noticed a gentleman lying supine on the ground near the bleachers. Without hesitation she and the 3 lacrosse coaches ran to the area.
 
                As they reached the location Laura threw her cell phone to a coach and had him call 911. Laura then hopped the fence and knelt next to the man’s head. There was another person knelt next to the man as well – the victims son-in-law, who happened to be an Orthopedist. Laura then sent the site supervisor to open the gate and direct the ambulance to their location upon its arrival at the scene. The ambulance would not arrive in a timely manner as there was a fire at a local gas station that required the attention of Emergency Medical Personnel.  The victim was the grandfather of a senior lacrosse player who was at the game celebrating Senior Day.
 

Diabetes in play: High school athletes don’t let it stop them

At a camp three years ago when he was 12, wrestler Zach McCauley’s blood sugar level dropped. He says he hadn’t passed out yet, but was dozing in a corner. The coaches hadn’t shared the information McCauley had diabetes, and one saw him “sleeping.”
 
“One of the coaches started throwing Post-it notes at me, saying, ‘This isn’t nap time!’ But my brother was there, and he said, ‘He’s a diabetic, he’s not napping.’” They ran to get the athletic trainer, who gave him juice immediately. He felt better quickly, spared from going unconscious.
 
That incident is the only troubling one varsity wrestler McCauley, 15, recalls, as he manages life with diabetes, a disease that affects how the body uses blood sugar (glucose) and can cause serious health problems. As an athlete, “everything just takes an extra step,” he says.  Pricking his finger several times a day, he monitors his blood glucose. He enters on a monitor what food he’s eating, such as carbohydrates, and takes needed insulin from a pump attached to his body.  He disconnects the pump during matches.
 
Larry Cooper, a licensed athletic trainer for Penn Trafford High School (Harrison City, Pa.), and chair of the secondary school committee of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, said he’s seen more high school athletes with diabetes compared to the past.
 
“We’ve seen an increase in the number of athletes who are insulin-dependent, he said. Penn Trafford now has five athletes with diabetes.
 

New Jersey To Require Cardiac Screenings For All Kids Under 19

New Jersey will soon be the first state in the nation to require health professionals to look for heart disease in young people during physical exams.
 
As CBS2’s Christine Sloan reported, right now, only student athletes are required to undergo cardiac screenings before playing organized sports. But concerns about sudden cardiac issues have broadened the requirement.
 
A genetic heart disorder took the lives of five members of Lisa Salberg’s family. Her sister, Lori, died at the young age of 36, and her father also died of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy – or HCM.
 
And at the age of 12, Salberg was diagnosed with the disorder herself. She is the founder and chief executive officer of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association, based in Denville.
 
HCM involves a thickening of the heart, and doctors said it is the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in children.
 
Salberg’s 19-year-old daughter, Becca, has the disorder too.
 
“My daughter is now 19. My daughter had an implantable defibrillator put in at the age of 10. But she’s protected,” Salberg said. “And we want be able to give others the opportunity to identify, treat and protect their children.”
 
Salberg said the new cardiac screening law in New Jersey will save lives by making cardiac screening mandatory during wellness checks for kids under 19.
 
The screening involves 14 simple questions.
 

March 31- Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Today brings a close to athletic training month and the athletic training month tips of the day.  At the ATSNJ, we are committed to sports safety so be sure to continue to visit our website as your main resource for sport safety tips and athletic training news.

If you read a tip that you found useful you can always come back to read it.  All tips for March 2015 athletic training month at http://atsnj.org/tags/tip-day

Remember to continue to promote sports safety everyday and that

"We Prepare - You Perform"

 

March 30 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Sports, Exercise, and the Benefits of Physical Activity for Individuals with Autism

With the disgnosis of autism on the rise at an alarming rate, more and more students diagnosed with this affliction are beginning to particpate in organized sports.  Its interesting to note that according to Autism Speaks, "research and anecdotal evidence suggest that some alternative therapeutic choices that include sports, exercise, and other physical activities can be a useful adjunct to traditional behavioral interventions, leading to improvement in symptoms, behaviors, and quality of life for individuals with autism."

The Autism Speaks website provides a plethora of excellent information for helping these brave children.

March 28 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

 

Ice or Heat for Sports Injury

Do you know when to use ice and when to use heat on a sports injury?

Acute and Chronic Injuries

Acute injuries are sudden, sharp, traumatic injuries that occur immediately (or within hours) and cause pain (possibly severe pain). Most often acute injuries result from some sort of impact or trauma such as a fall, sprain, or collision and it's pretty obvious what caused the injury.

Acute injuries also cause common signs and symptoms of injury such as pain, tenderness, redness, skin that is warm to the touch, swelling and inflammation. If you have swelling, you have an acute injury.

Chronic Injuries, on the other hand, can be subtle and slow to develop. They sometimes come and go, and may cause dull pain or soreness. They are often the result of overuse, but sometimes develop when an acute injury is not properly treated and doesn't heal.

Ice

Icing an injured body part is an important part of treatment. Icing injuries can be effective for sprains, strains, overuse injuries and bruises.

March 26 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Youth Sports Injury Prevention Suggestion

Here good document on sports safety recommendations.  While  mainly focused on Japan, there are some good pieces of information that are pertinent to sports safety in the United States. Particularly suggestions for reducing injuries and head injuries. There are also some good statistics as well.

Topics covered include:

  • Youth Sports Injury Prevention
  • The scope of the youth sports injury problem in the United States
  • Recommendation to prevent youth sports injuries

To read the entire https://coa.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/AaronLMillerUSAReportforMRIForCOA.pdf

March 24 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

As a follow up to yesterday tip of the day.  Here are some tips that may work for you as you try to avoid shin pain.

  • Increase stride rate to around 180 steps per minute. You can measure your stride rate by counting the number of times a single foot hits the ground in a minute, then multiplying by two.  180 is the rate that most top endurance runners have.  
  • Minimize the number of hard workouts. Running hard puts more strain on your shins.  Build up a slow mileage base until you beat shin pain.  At the very least, don’t run hard two days in a row.  Mix in very slow runs and off days to let your shins recover.
  • Run almost exclusively on soft trails, tracks, or treadmills. 
  • Wear the proper shoe for your feet.
  • Stretch before and after every run.

If shin pains does occur seek the appropriate medical attention fro evaluation and the proper treatment strategies.

 

March 23 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Shin Splints vs Stress Fractures

With spring track season now underway for over 3 weeks, in New Jersey, we thought it would be good to explain the difference between shin splints vs stress fractures of the lower leg.

A shin splint is an inflammation of the tissue running along the bone in the shin. Shin splints develop when the muscles and tissues tear due to the repeated pounding of running. This is usually caused by inflexible calf muscles in the back of the lower-leg, improper shoe choice, shoes that are not providing enough cushion, or ramping distance too quickly. A stress fracture is a very small crack or group of cracks that forms in the bone itself, similar to the white crease that would develop if you bent a credit card a few times.

The major difference in differentiating between a shin splint and a stress fracture is usually what we call “point tenderness”. With a shin splint, if you run your fingers along the shin, it will usually hurt all along the bone as you pass your fingers down the leg. With a stress fracture, there is usually one specific spot (or multiple spots) that hurts really badly. These spots are usually about the size of dime. The rest of the area will be much less tender.  In addition, people with stress fractures will also have pain with walking, sitting and even sometimes complain of pain that wakes them up from sleeping at night.

Stress fractures are much less common than shin splints. In most cases, a shin splint is a more likely explanation for shin pain, especially in new runners.

March 22 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

"High" Ankle Sprain vs a "Common" Ankle Sprain

Ankle sprains are common injuries. In fact, they are one of the most common injuries encountered in the United States. But what is the difference between a common ankle sprain and a high ankle sprain? And why do athletes with a high ankle sprain seem to be out for a longer period of time? The reason lies in the anatomy of the ankle and the different ligaments injured in a common vs. high ankle sprain. 

The ankle is made of three bones in the lower leg:  the tibia, the fibula, and the talus. These bones act together to form the ankle joint, which typically sustains loads three times a person’s body weight with normal daily activity. The soft tissues that surround the ankle allow for its stability and motion. The ligaments, in particular, stabilize the ankle. 

Common Ankle Sprains

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