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Concussion Resources

Selecting a Concussion Educator: Robb Rehberg Thinks Athletic Trainers Best Suited For The Role

With youth sports concussion safety laws in place in all 50 states, increased public awareness about concussions, and growing concern about the long-term effect of repetitive head impacts, the demand for concussion education, not just for parents, coaches, and athletes, but for health care professionals, such as primary care physcians and emergency room doctors, as well is at an all-time high, and promises to go even higher in the coming years.
 
But who should sports programs - whether school-based or independently run - hire to educate athletes, coaches, and parents about concussions? What kind of training, education and experience should they have?
 
We decided to ask a number of leading concussion educators.  First up is Robb Rehberg, Professor and Coordinator of Athletic Training Clinical Education at William Paterson University in Wayne, New Jersey.
 
MomsTEAM: Tell us a little bit about your training and education that prepared you to be a concussion educator?
 
Rehberg: My first lessons in dealing with concussion came during my days playing footbal in high school. Since that time, concussions have always been an area of interest for me. I'm an athletic trainer by trade, and my undergraduate degree is in athletic training. I also earned a PhD in Health Science Education and Research, which has helped me not only understand the research, but be able to present it to various groups in a way that is easily understood.
 

March 29 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

With the Lacrosse regular season fast approaching, its always a good idea to review a few tips regarding helmets in lacrosse.

US Lacrosse has an article on the proper ways to remove a lacrosse helmet facemask, since they can differ from the typical football helmet that many emergency personnel are more familiar with.

Lacrosse Helmet Facemask/Chinguard Removal Hints

US LAcrosse also provides these recommendations for helmet fitting.

Study: Concussion recovery time doubles when injury is sustained during school year

Concussions and the treatment after one is sustained have been at the forefront of media coverage in recent years. What once was viewed by some as brag-worthy or a badge of honor now is being taken seriously for its potential immediate and long-term effects.
 
While progress has been made in how the seriousness of a concussion is perceived, it’s still relatively unknown when it’s acceptable for individuals, including children, to return to normal cognitive and physical activity after suffering one.
 
According to a study by the Concussion Clinic at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, a child who sustains a concussion during the school year takes significantly more time to recover than one who suffers a similar injury during the summer.
 
“We were surprised at the magnitude of the differences,” Robert Doss, PsyD, co-director of the Pediatric Concussion Program and one of the study’s researchers, said. “We weren’t surprised that it was in that direction; just simply that the magnitude was what it was.”
 
Researchers took patients seen in the Concussion Clinic at Children’s from 2011-12 — 43 children who suffered concussions during the school year and 44 injured in the summer — and monitored their progress. For the children who sustained a concussion in the summer, the average number of days to recover was 35. Recovery time more than doubled (72 days) when the injury was sustained during the school year.
 

March 20 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Reminder: March is Brain Injury Awareness Month
 
Coaches, athletes  and parents can play an active role in keeping their children injury-free. http://newbrunswick.patch.com/articles/march-is-brain-injury-awareness-month-1866dac3
 
Use the various resources available on the ATSNJ website to best educate, prevent and manage concussions.
Resource Handouts:
http://atsnj.org/documents/pdf/ATSNJ_HeadInjuryInfo.pdf
http://atsnj.org/documents/pdf/ATSNJ_Concussion_Sheet.pdf
 
and article, handouts, videos and more:  http://atsnj.org/tags/concussion
 
 
 
 

Brain Injury Association of America Applauds Introduction of National Traumatic Brain Injury Surveillance System Act of 2014

During a press conference this afternoon, Susan H. Connors, President and CEO of the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA), endorsed the National Brain Injury Surveillance System Act of 2014

During a press conference this afternoon, Susan H. Connors, President and CEO of the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA), endorsed the National Brain Injury Surveillance System Act of 2014. Congressmen Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-N.J.) and Tom Rooney (R-Penn.) introduced the legislation today, which is Brain Injury Awareness Day.
 
When enacted, the legislation will direct the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to collect national data on traumatic brain injuries (TBI) across the lifespans of people with brain injuries. It will also collect additional data on individuals at the time of the injury, such as the severity of the injury, previous history of brain injury, co-occurring issues such as substance abuse or PTSD, and pre-existing conditions like ADHD or learning disabilities.
 
“When an individual sustains a brain injury it is not an event, it is the start of a lifelong disability,” said Connors. “An individual with a brain injury needs the appropriate access to care immediately after their injury and continued therapy so they may be active in their communities and return to work.”
 
“Comprehensive data will drive the development of systems of care that are needed to meet this growing public health problem, as well as guide prevention efforts and support research activities, that I hope will someday lead to a cure.” Connors said in closing. “BIAA thanks Congressman Pascrell and Congressman Rooney for introducing the National Traumatic Brain Injury Surveillance System Act of 2014 today.”
 

March 8 Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 1.7 million people suffer a traumatic brain injury, or TBI, each year.

During March, in recognition of Brain Injury Awareness Month, the ATSNJ is continuing to take steps to increase awareness about brain injuries, including prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, while reducing the stigma for persons who seek care.

To read and/or print out our head injury information sheet visit: http://www.atsnj.org/documents/pdf/ATSNJ_HeadInjuryInfo.pdf

For additional concussion resources visit: http://atsnj.org/tags/concussion

 

 

March 4 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

ATSNJ Concussion Policy Checklist

New Jersey's concussion law signed by Governor Chris Christie on Dec. 7, 2010, recognizes the dangers associated with head injuries and concussions. One of the provisions of the law is that each school district shall develop a written policy concerning the prevention and treatment of sports related concussion and head injuries among student-athletes. 

The ATSNJ has developed a concussion policy checklist so you can check your school's policy for compliance, to read the entire checklist visit:  http://atsnj.org/concussioncheck

March 3 -Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Participation in youth sports is at an all-time high. With participation comes sports injuries: 

  • 1 in 5 Emergency Room Visits are result of sports, recreation, or exercise – 3.65 million/yr (CDC)
  • Injuries to children 15 & under, playing the 29 most popular sports in the United States cost the United States public $49 billion/yr (The Consumer Products Safety Council)
  • An athlete’s injury has an effect on his/her parents, coaches, the team, his schooling,  health care professional, teammates

March is National Athletic Training Month.  The ATSNJ recognizes the important role parents, and coaches  play in preventing injuries and because of this the ATSNJ has developed a presentation to assist ensuring sports safety.

To see this presentation visit: http://www.atsnj.org/documents/pdf/2010_ATSNJSportsSafetyforCoachesandParents.pdf

 

March 1 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

March is National Athletic Training Month.  The 2014 theme is "We've Got Your Back".

  • An estimated 1.4 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations occur annually among U.S. high school student athletes participating in practices or competitions in 2006, according to the Center for Disease Control.
  • 62% of sports related injuries occur during practices, according to Safe Kids USA
  • 75 % of all school-related spinal cord injuries occur during sports activities according to a 2007 study by the American Academy of Neurology.
  • 15% of high school sports injuries were classified as severe by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons according to a 2008 study
  • More than 5% of high school athletes are concussed each year from collision and contact sports according Journal of Athletic Training
  • 41% of concussed high school athletes returned to competition too soon according to the American Academy of Neurology

Athletic trainers are highly skilled licensed health care professionals who work under the direction of physicians and are uniquely qualified to specialize in providing health care to the physically active population.  

For more information on how  "We've Got Your Back", visit:  http://atsnj.org/page/Information-about-athletic-trainers

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